“The one meta-level thing is to take agency over your own learning. In the traditional academic model, you’re passive. You sit in a chair, and the teacher tries to project knowledge at you; some of it sticks, some of it doesn’t. That’s not an effective way to learn. Worse, it creates a mind-set of “you need to teach me,” so when you’re on your own, you think, “I can’t learn.” Anyone in any industry will tell you there’s new stuff to learn every week these days. So you have to say, “What information and people do I have at my disposal? What questions do I need to ask? How do I gauge whether I’ve really understood it?” Khan Academy is designed to give students that agency. If you want to get more tangible, I would say learn how to program a computer, more about the law, and definitely statistics.”
-

Salman Khan in response to: “What are the key concepts students should understand in order to be successful in today’s workplace?”

In my opinion this is important because Education is the reason we’re where we are. And we’ve pretty much got it all wrong. I’ll be posting more on this (and others) in the next couple of weeks, hopefully. 

africaisdonesuffering:

February 2014: When Did You Fall in Love With Your Africanness?
For me, it happened whilst in secondary school. I’m not sure what exactly triggered it. It could’ve been the people, or the clubs and society. Or perhaps, the board that hung up at the top of our assembly hall that spelt our motto “Knowledge in the Service of Africa”. I’m still not sure what it was but I know I haven’t looked back since.
From all the TV and movies we’ve watched, all the magazines we’ve glanced through, it’s not uncommon to realize that at some point we wanted be some mix of races to dilute our Africanness.  It was cool to shorten and Anglicize our traditional African names, especially common with our Nigerian friends; ‘Abasiodiong’ would become ‘Abby’, pronounced with a distinctively foreign accent. But then, at some points in our lives we woke up to wholly accept our Africanness.
We’ve started trends in African fashion and pop culture; we now pick our spicy jollof rice over that Chinese or continental dish.  We have begun to write more and more about our stories, tales and identities. Most importantly, we engage with our Africanness to become integral parts of the solutions to the challenges we face. This newfound love has gone ahead to create a demand for everything African, and now, even the large global media giants cannot help but have African twists, features and broadcasts to capture our interests.
When did you start saying, “Yes, I’m from Africa” instead of “I’m not, but my parents are”? When did Afrobeats begin to fill your playlists? Just about every African, especially those in the diaspora can relate to the struggle of having been intimidated for being African. And those who have gone past intimidation to pride would agree with me, it’s an awesome feeling.
We doff our hats off to the Achebes and Soyinkas who made African literature cool, the Dbanjs and Sarkodies who put African music on the map, or the Kofi Annans who continue to make sure we’re represented at the helm of affairs. To keep this cool for the continent we love so much, we’ll have to work hard to maintain our African excellence.
So, this month of love, as Rise Africa, we’ll talk about that moment when you fell in love with your Africanness. We’ll go beyond that to talk of how we can sustain this cool. We will see what roles the diaspora and the continent have to foster that love for our continent, and for the generations after us.
Our goal is to build a community of Africans who have the confidence to speak their voice and the awareness to engage in productive conversation with one another about the shared and unique lives we live as Africans and members of the African diaspora. We imagine an Africa, where we’re all involved. As always, we value your participation. What creative expression would you like to share? We’d like to know. Share your thoughts, experiences and reflections on when you fell in love with your Africanness with the Rise Africa community. If you or someone you know would be interested in participating in this series, we encourage you to contribute. Just e-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com for more information. Click to access all articles under our February 2014 theme.
-Michael Annor

africaisdonesuffering:

February 2014: When Did You Fall in Love With Your Africanness?

For me, it happened whilst in secondary school. I’m not sure what exactly triggered it. It could’ve been the people, or the clubs and society. Or perhaps, the board that hung up at the top of our assembly hall that spelt our motto “Knowledge in the Service of Africa”. I’m still not sure what it was but I know I haven’t looked back since.

From all the TV and movies we’ve watched, all the magazines we’ve glanced through, it’s not uncommon to realize that at some point we wanted be some mix of races to dilute our Africanness.  It was cool to shorten and Anglicize our traditional African names, especially common with our Nigerian friends; ‘Abasiodiong’ would become ‘Abby’, pronounced with a distinctively foreign accent. But then, at some points in our lives we woke up to wholly accept our Africanness.

We’ve started trends in African fashion and pop culture; we now pick our spicy jollof rice over that Chinese or continental dish.  We have begun to write more and more about our stories, tales and identities. Most importantly, we engage with our Africanness to become integral parts of the solutions to the challenges we face. This newfound love has gone ahead to create a demand for everything African, and now, even the large global media giants cannot help but have African twists, features and broadcasts to capture our interests.

When did you start saying, “Yes, I’m from Africa” instead of “I’m not, but my parents are”? When did Afrobeats begin to fill your playlists? Just about every African, especially those in the diaspora can relate to the struggle of having been intimidated for being African. And those who have gone past intimidation to pride would agree with me, it’s an awesome feeling.

We doff our hats off to the Achebes and Soyinkas who made African literature cool, the Dbanjs and Sarkodies who put African music on the map, or the Kofi Annans who continue to make sure we’re represented at the helm of affairs. To keep this cool for the continent we love so much, we’ll have to work hard to maintain our African excellence.

So, this month of love, as Rise Africa, we’ll talk about that moment when you fell in love with your Africanness. We’ll go beyond that to talk of how we can sustain this cool. We will see what roles the diaspora and the continent have to foster that love for our continent, and for the generations after us.

Our goal is to build a community of Africans who have the confidence to speak their voice and the awareness to engage in productive conversation with one another about the shared and unique lives we live as Africans and members of the African diaspora. We imagine an Africa, where we’re all involved. As always, we value your participation. What creative expression would you like to share? We’d like to know. Share your thoughts, experiences and reflections on when you fell in love with your Africanness with the Rise Africa community. If you or someone you know would be interested in participating in this series, we encourage you to contribute. Just e-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com for more information. Click to access all articles under our February 2014 theme.

-Michael Annor

narrateafrica:

We are ready to launch - We are looking for you to be our next featured book club member. Be instrumental in instigating conversations ! 
Check out Last Seasons Featured Book Club Members http://narrateafrica.com/featuredmembers
Deadline FEB 5th 2014 
Find application here :  Featured Book Club Members Application

Please take special notice and share with anyone who’ll be interested. Thank You!

narrateafrica:

We are ready to launch - We are looking for you to be our next featured book club member. Be instrumental in instigating conversations ! 

Check out Last Seasons Featured Book Club Members http://narrateafrica.com/featuredmembers

Deadline FEB 5th 2014 

Find application here :  Featured Book Club Members Application

Please take special notice and share with anyone who’ll be interested. Thank You!

…sigh.

I admired Komla Dumor for one thousand and one reasons. For starters, because of how much he got to travel around, and the people he got to meet and interview on the job, and most of all, what he did with these opportunities. It’s a shock, a big, big shock. 

Unlike most people, I don’t really remember his Super Morning Show days. My fondest memories of him were from his days with the BBC and his active use of social media; he always had something good to share. I also loved his involvement in other non-BBC things. TEDx Euston, Mo Ibrahim Foundation, Afrinolly, and a lot more things.

"When rain beats on a leopard it wets it, but rain does not wash out its spots." 

This Akan proverb just popped up on my twitter timeline and it somehow makes me feel better about this. The rain can’t wash our spots.

What I’ll give to see him in action again… sigh.

“Your purpose was to break glass ceilings so the rest of us can enter. A race well run.”
- Lerato Mbele (In Memory of Komla Dumor)

Stale Words

This blog’s been dead-ish for a while. I didn’t just abandon it. My absence has been for a number of reasons. I’m going to try to list them in this post, and hopefully, by the last line I’ll know if it’s time to come back.

Stale

I felt my thoughts, style, ideas, opinions, writings, babbling had become stale. I wasn’t convinced I was in a position to be writing. I needed fresh air, fresh thoughts, a new insight so I took time off, enjoyed my dashboard, and timeline, and newsfeed, and did other things that made me happy. Within this period I’ve tried my hands on photography, a lot more graphic design, illustrator. I watched a lot more YouTubes, movies, series, etc. I felt the same way with Twitter, and was off for sometime. I’m tweeting again, mostly links and things I’ve read that I can relate to. On top of it all, I didn’t like how I was sounding, and I feared I might end up sounding a certain way. Ugh… I’d have hated that.

Internet

This week, someone reminded me that if you keep doing the same thing and keep getting the same undesirable results, you may be a fool. So before I went away, I had been complaining about my internet problems and it was troubling, and my efforts were largely helpless. I decided to instead of whine, wean myself off my addiction (used very lightly) to being connected. I tried very hard. And during this period, I’ve managed to read books, watch movies I should have watched years ago, etc. It’s been fun. Also, since my connection’s been unreliable, I’ve found it easier to summarise my thoughts into series of 140 characters for twitter. Straightforward, and less hustle. 

Read > Write

Speaking of movies, and series, I felt it was best for me to become more a consumer than a sub-par producer of content. There’s so much inspiring, amazing, creative, interesting, funny, amusing, moving content out there. I’ve read a couple of books, watched a ton of movies (which is very unlike me), read a ton of articles, and I’ve actually broadened my scope. There’s still a lot more to do. I’m sure my next posts will be links I’ve found share-worthy.

I bought a new theme, in the hope that it’ll bring me back here. We’ll see how that works out in the coming weeks.

**And I’m gradually removing old posts I don’t like. I haven’t written in such a long time. It makes working on assignments hard.